Posts tagged: statistics

Current Cost Classic vs CC128

Back in November I bought (well, actually I signed up to a new deal with E.ON which included one) a Current Cost electricity monitor, and hooked it up to my server so I could gather the stats for Cacti. I do this by running a small perl script which looks as follows:

#!/usr/bin/perl
# /usr/local/bin/cc-classic.pl
 
use Device::SerialPort qw( :PARAM :STAT 0.07 );
 
$port = "/dev/currentcost";
 
$ob = Device::SerialPort->new($port)
      or die "Can not open port $port\n";
$ob->baudrate(9600);
$ob->write_settings;
$ob->close;
 
open(SERIAL, "+>$port");
while ($line = <SERIAL>)
{
  if ($line =~ m!<ch1><watts>0*(\d+)</watts></ch1>.*<tmpr>\s*(-*[\d.]+)</tmpr>!)
  {
     $watts = $1;
     $temperature = $2;
     print "watts:$watts temp:$temperature";
     last;
  }
}
close(SERIAL);

This would give me the two values I am interested in; watts and temperature (since it sits in the garage node 0 ;)) in Cacti’s format:

$ /usr/local/bin/cc-classic.pl
watts:761 temp:11.3

But today, I received my new unit, a Current Cost CC128. It’s main benefit is that it supports individual appliance monitors, which makes the output even more useful. So, armed with a draft copy of the CC128 XML output document, I prepared my script to read as follows:

#!/usr/bin/perl
# /usr/local/bin/cc-cc128.pl
 
use Device::SerialPort qw( :PARAM :STAT 0.07 );
 
$port = "/dev/currentcost";
 
$ob = Device::SerialPort->new($port)
      or die "Can not open port $port\n";
$ob->baudrate(57600);
$ob->write_settings;
$ob->close;
 
open(SERIAL, "+>$port");
while ($line = <SERIAL>)
{
  if ($line =~ m!<tmpr>\s*(-*[\d.]+)</tmpr>.*<ch1><watts>0*(\d+)</watts></ch1>!)
  {
     $watts = $2;
     $temperature = $1;
     print "watts:$watts temp:$temperature";
     last;
  }
}
close(SERIAL);

And guess what… that works just fine ;)

For those who read diff:

$ diff /usr/local/bin/cc-classic.pl /usr/local/bin/cc-cc128.pl 
2c2
< # /usr/local/bin/cc-classic.pl
---
> # /usr/local/bin/cc-cc128.pl
10c10
< $ob->baudrate(9600);
---
> $ob->baudrate(57600);
17c17
<   if ($line =~ m!<ch1><watts>0*(\d+)</watts></ch1>.*<tmpr>\s*(-*[\d.]+)</tmpr>!)
---
>   if ($line =~ m!<tmpr>\s*(-*[\d.]+)</tmpr>.*<ch1><watts>0*(\d+)</watts></ch1>!)
19,20c19,20
<      $watts = $1;
<      $temperature = $2;
---
>      $watts = $2;
>      $temperature = $1;

Please note, the above only works with 1 sensor (the main transmitter), so it is likely to change in the future. For now it suits my need.

Lies, damned lies, and statistics

I’ve been using a 1 wire network for quite some time now, but when I deleted a directory to much on my server, I lost a lot of the stats that I had gathered. A couple of weeks ago I finally got my behind in gear again and rebuild my network, this time making sure it all gets backed up ;)

One day I’ll write something about how it’s all been done, but for now you’ll have to suffice with some pretty graphs.

Here’s the daily graph for the temperatures in our bedrooms for the past 24 hours:

Daily temperatures Bedrooms

And recently I added a Current Cost meter to my network, which gives me the shocking facts about my electricity usage for the past 24 hours:

Daily electricy usage

The above graphs are updated hourly, and I’ve got other graphs too, extending the period of graphing. You can find them here for the time being.

Update 25.1.2009

And now you’re able to follow the stats on twitter: http://twitter.com/awoogadotnl